Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty

Honestly, I would never have picked this book from my endless to-be-read list if it wasn’t for the tv show. I still think about it every day so it only made sense to get myself the book and find out more about the characters to whom I attached myself so fiercely.

Synopsis

Big Little Lies follows three women, each at a crossroads:

Madeline is a force to be reckoned with. She’s funny and biting, passionate, she remembers everything and forgives no one. Her ex-husband and his yogi new wife have moved into her beloved beachside community, and their daughter is in the same kindergarten class as Madeline’s youngest (how is this possible?). And to top it all off, Madeline’s teenage daughter seems to be choosing Madeline’s ex-husband over her. (How. Is. This. Possible?).

Celeste is the kind of beautiful woman who makes the world stop and stare. While she may seem a bit flustered at times, who wouldn’t be, with those rambunctious twin boys? Now that the boys are starting school, Celeste and her husband look set to become the king and queen of the school parent body. But royalty often comes at a price, and Celeste is grappling with how much more she is willing to pay.

New to town, single mum Jane is so young that another mother mistakes her for the nanny. Jane is sad beyond her years and harbours secret doubts about her son. But why? While Madeline and Celeste soon take Jane under their wing, none of them realises how the arrival of Jane and her inscrutable little boy will affect them all.

From Goodreads

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Big Little Lies published by Amy Einhorn Books, 2014

Big Little Lies the book ended up being quite different from the tv adaptation. However, both versions are gripping, funny and clever. I was not disappointed but I did wish the ending had been exactly like the show’s.

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Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children (Miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children #1) by Ransom Riggs

This book has grown in popularity ever since the screen adaptation by Tim Burton was announced. It has a huge fanbase and I’m sure that when the movie comes out, everyone will rush to the bookstores to get it. So it’s time to review it.

Synopsis

After his grandfather’s mysterious death, sixteen-year-old Jacob travels to a remote island off the coast of Wales, where he discovers the crumbling ruins of Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children. As Jacob explores its abandoned bedrooms and hallways, it becomes clear that the children were more than just peculiar. They may have been dangerous. They may have been quarantined on a deserted island for a good reason. And somehow—impossible though it seems—they may still be alive.

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Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children published by Quirk Books (2013)

It hooked me from the very first sentence:

“I had just come to accept that my life would be ordinary when extraordinary things began to happen.”

I’m lucky to have thought “oh, I know that feeling” when I first read it. It is precisely because of this that I defend the idea that a book must have, mandatorily, a good opening line. But this book has way more than one great line. And that’s mainly the reason why I didn’t stop reading it when I got slightly bored with it after the leading mystery was solved.

Ransom Riggs has the kind of writing that makes you feel guilty of putting the book down before you’re officially finished with it. That’s why I don’t regret having stuck with his peculiar story until the very end. Even though it gets too weird at some point, his writing makes everything seem better, sound better, work better.

I won’t spoil anything. Instead, I will leave here one of my favourite passages from the book in an attempt to seduce you into his strange world:

“Stars, too, are time travelers. How many of those ancient points of light were the last echoes of suns now dead? How many had been born but their light not yet come this far? If all the suns but ours had collapsed tonight, how many lifetimes would it take us to realize that we are not alone? I had always known the sky was full of mysteries – but not until now had I realized how full of them the earth was.”

Fae

If you’re fond of peculiar things, click here:

The Book Depository

The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie (Flavia de Luce #1) by Alan Bradley

“Heaven must be a place where the library is open twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week.”

Synopsis

Flavia de Luce, an 11-year-old aspiring chemist and with a particular interest for poison, invites us into her life full of a series of inexplicable events: a dead bird is found on her doorstep with a post stamp pinned to its beak. Hours later, she finds a dying man in the garden who whispers her something in Latin. For Flavia, who feels both appalled and delighted by what happened, life begins at last: exactly when murder comes to Buckshaw, her home.

 

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The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie (Flavia de Luce #1) published by Not Avail (2015)

 

Flavia is more than what she seems at first: she may be rude but she is also thoughtful; she is incredibly clever but definitely dangerous. She is impossible but somewhat realistic. Because children are unusual in their own ways and Flavia is no exception. She just has an inclination towards poison and trouble. But that’s not exactly what made me love her so much.

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