Fragile Things: Short Fictions and Wonders by Neil Gaiman

Synopsis

This is a stunning collection of short stories by acclaimed fantasy writer Neil Gaiman. His distinctive genius has been championed by writers as diverse as Norman Mailer and Stephen King. With The Sandman Neil Gaiman created one of the most sophisticated, intelligent, and influential graphic novel series of our time. Now after the recent success of his latest novel Anansi Boys, Gaiman has produced Fragile Things, his second collection of short fiction. These stories will dazzle your senses, haunt your imagination, and move you to the very depths of your soul. This extraordinary compilation reveals one of the world’s most gifted storytellers at the height of his powers.

                                                                                              From Goodreads

Fragile-things-by-Neil-Gaiman
Fragile Things published by Headline Publishing Group (2007)

At the end of the introduction of his book, Neil Gaiman says:

“Stories, like people and butterflies and songbirds’ eggs and human hearts and dreams, are also fragile things, made up of nothing stronger or more lasting than twenty-six letters and a handful of punctuation marks. Or they are words on the air, composed of sounds and ideas – abstract, invisible, gone once they’ve been spoken and what could be more frail than that? But some stories, small, simples ones about setting out on adventures or people doing wonders, tales of miracles and monsters, have outlasted all the people who told them, and some of them have outlasted the lands in which they were created.”

The stories in this collection are not fragile. They are strange ones, tales of monsters who are sometimes just human, of nightmares and many different types of horrors. There is nothing frail about fears or adventures. Neil Gaiman’s stories are strong because they sound true and there are very few things stronger than truth.


That is the beauty of his stories: as you read them, you start forgetting that they are just tales born out of his endless imagination. His characters are rich; they all have a past we want to know more about and they are often (if not always) wrapped in mystery. More importantly, they are always interesting in some way or another. Every story seemed to me as if it really happened somewhere, to someone.

Neil Gaiman makes you believe in every word.

“Fragile Things” really is a collection of short fictions AND wonders. If you are looking for something extraordinary in the true sense of the word, you have found it.

Fae

 

If you’d like to enter Neil Gaiman’s imaginary world, click the link below:

The Book Depository

 

 

Fragile

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4 Comments Add yours

  1. MyBookJacket says:

    I’ve got this on my shelves and it’s collecting dust. I loved ocean at the end of the lane so much that I can’t bring myself to read it in case I don’t like it. Im glad you enjoyed it though. That’s such a gorgeous cover!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Don’t let it get too dusty, it’s such a good book! Even though it’s a book of short stories, every single one of them is beautiful in their own way. Also, it’s a great book to read when you’re really tired and just feel like reading a bit before going to sleep. And, guess what, I have The Ocean at the End of the Lane ‘collecting dust’ on my shelf because I haven’t found the time to read it yet! But I will soon and then review it here (: And yes, this edition is beautiful! Thank you so much for commenting (:
      xx Fae

      Liked by 1 person

      1. MyBookJacket says:

        Please do check out ocean and the end of the lane. It’s magnificent. Absolutely worth every second spent with it. Check out the audiobook of you can. He’s narrated it himself.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I will read it as soon as I finish the two books I’m reading now (: and I will check out the audiobook too, that’s so cool!

        Liked by 1 person

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